Breast Cancer meme Cyberactivism

Cyberactivism is instrumental in influencing behavioral change to achieve set objectives in the era of increased internet access and mobile devices. This case study examines cyberactivism and its effectiveness in mobilizing momentum behind a cause. Cyberactivism allows individuals or organizations to employ social networking platforms to reach and mobilize followers, disseminate information, and advance a cause or movement. In other words, it drives online mobilization, which leads to participation and brings awareness to a cause. As technology is fast becoming an integral element of building a social movement, individuals embrace the internet and user-generated technologies to advance community awareness.

The Breast Cancer Meme on Facebook is a well-known meme campaign that utilized cyberactivism to mobilize and create a buzz around Breast Cancer. The campaign encouraged women to update their social media status with their name and the color of the bra they were wearing, where you like to put your purse, and how long it takes to do your hair, followed by the word inches. The grass-roots campaign spread virally and served as a fast, free, and fun way for women to raise awareness about breast cancer and remind other women to examine themselves. Although the meme activities or games gained substantial momentum and understanding of Breast Cancer, heavy sexual connotations were considered insulting and inappropriate, especially to Breast Cancer survivors.

Lacking core purpose (Call-to-action)

In general, the meme campaign’s problem is that it lacked inclusiveness, a call to action, or achieved meaningful progress in the overall fight against breast cancer, such as research, early detection, donations, and education. Despite the increased number in mobilization and participation, organizations that have support breast cancer research and awareness recorded limited monetary donations, volunteers, or the spread of useful information throughout the meme campaign.

In general, the meme campaign’s problem is that it lacked inclusiveness, a call to action, or achieved meaningful progress in the overall fight against breast cancer, such as research, early detection, donations, and education. Despite the increased number in mobilization and participation, organizations that have support breast cancer research and awareness recorded limited monetary donations, volunteers, or the spread of useful information throughout the meme campaign.

Most women participated in the fun activities without an explicit understanding of the real purpose, and that lack of individualistic judgment defeated the call to activism. Another notable deficiency of the meme campaign is that it lacked inclusion, as only women received cryptic messages designed to get men confused. For instance, the meme that asked women where they like to put their purses should have added men’s wallets to be more inclusive. Although breast cancer is most often found in women, men also suffer from the condition. More than 2,500 men are expected to be diagnosed with Breast Cancer, and an estimated 520 men are expected to die from the disease.

Archiving meaningful results

Cyberactivism and other prosocial movements have a natural advantage in driving social media mobilization, reaching millions of users, and providing people with real-life, actionable items to help the overall cause. Consequently, the cryptic message should have a call to action such as (click here) that will send curious readers to sites where they could learn about breast cancer symptoms, monthly self-exams, or a resource that provide rides to chemo patients. Additionally, the meme should have links on how and where to donate, where and how a volunteer can sign up or sign a petition. Encourage people to get their yearly mammograms, understand the risk factors, and teach teenagers how to perform self-checks at home regularly.

Cyberactivism gives consumers control by allowing them to create and generate content and be involved in discussions in every step of the process, including product and message design. Which pulls consumers in, instead of pushing messages out, and turns the consumer into brand advocates. This often creates trust and a lasting relationship between the consumer and the brand. Mobilization is only possible if brands are willing to give up control of their brand narrative and allow users to participate and design, create, and produce media content. Additionally, cyberactivism needs to be a tangible action that links the message and creates real-life experiences critical in mobilizing participation for a cause.

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